How will you spend yours?

More evidence of blog-induced paranoia in the “traditional” press.

The latest edition of Private Eye (no.1214) carries a review of Cityboy: Beer and Loathing in the Square Mile by Geraint Anderson.  After explaining that Cityboy had its origins in thelondonpaper as a “sort of pretend blog”, the reviewer sulkily observes:

Like anything that looks a bit like a blog, its author* was swiftly signed up to produce a hardback book for tons of money.

Unsurprisingly, given that this is how the review starts, the book is found wanting in almost every respect and the reviewer concludes by suggesting:

Maybe it was foolish to expect any more.  Cityboy might not have been a real blog, but this book does demonstrate many of the weaknesses of the form: arrogance, carelessness and, above all, a terrible poverty of imagination.

Arrogance, carelessness and poverty of imagination?  How irritating –  it’s not as if you’d ever find any of these faults in any other of the print media.

 

* I assume it was the column which “looked a bit like a blog” rather than its author.  Carelessness?  You decide.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to How will you spend yours?

  1. Tim Footman says:

    So something that was not a blog had some of the less attractive attributes of some blogs, and thus becomes a stick with which we can beat blogs. Er… right…

  2. BiB says:

    On a lovely big cake for all us bloggers.

    Let’s march on Private Eye’s offices, wherever they are, and exact revenge. We can think about how on the way there.

  3. Marsha Klein says:

    Tim: I know! I think the argument is – blogs are rubbish because some other things are also rubbish (this argument for a start).

    BiB: Chocolate for me, please. I think we should spend exactly as long thinking about our revenge as this reviewer spent thinking about the internal logic of the review.

  4. I always found the Cityboy column really funny so I may read the book now I no longer have access to the London Paper or whatever it was published in. There was also a Citygirl column the author of which contributed to a journalists’ board I read. She used to whinge periodically because apparently her column didn’t get as many readers’ fan letters as Cityboy’s did and she was paranoid that no-one liked it. She also admitted to being a freelance writer working at home who hadn’t actually worked in the City for years so the column was quite clearly fiction.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s